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November 2010

The geometry of human coronary arteries from a CTA scan, shown at 12.5 micron resolution. The inset shows blood-flow geometry detail. The red in the detail highlights red blood cells, not endothelial shear stress (ESS), which is represented as a color map on the arterial walls. (Image courtesy of the author.)

Pressure and flow

November 16th, 2010 Updated: November 29th, 2011

The first large-scale simulation of blood flow in coronary arteries enlists a realistic description of the vessels’ geometries. Researchers reported on the simulation today at the SC10 supercomputing conference in New Orleans.

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Computational sciences gets a Harvard institute

November 16th, 2010 Updated: March 16th, 2011

Projects such as looking at blood flow in the coronary arteries highlight the value of computation to understand problems in a variety of disciplines, including engineering, medicine, biology, the physical sciences and business. Seeing the need to expand course offerings and graduate student research opportunities, Cherry Murray, dean of the Harvard School of Engineering and […]

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A frame from a WRF, or weather research and forecasting model, that shows an area over Oklahoma where the FASTER fast-cloud physics project will be put to the test.

In climate modeling, speed matters

November 10th, 2010 Updated: November 30th, 2011

A Brookhaven team wants to build the ‘fast physics’ behind clouds, air-suspended particles and precipitation into global climate models.

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The wings that fly FASTER

November 10th, 2010 Updated: November 30th, 2011

If FASTER can be considered a jet that speeds global climate modelers to analyze fast physics processes, its wings are the testbed and associated research. The testbed integrates two major “fast” components: a single column model (SCM), a roughly 100 kilometer by 100 km column that complements traditional global climate models; and a numerical weather […]

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October 2010

This frame from the Via Lactea II visualization shows the dark matter halo as it might look today, more than 13.7 billion years since the Big Bang. Gravity has drawn the partcles into dense clumps, which retain much of their stucture as they are drawn toward the halo’s center.  The color scale shows dark matter density increasing from blue to white.

Seeing the invisible

October 6th, 2010 Updated: February 22nd, 2013

Armed with computing power from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, researchers are detailing the nature of dark matter surrounding a galaxy much like our own Milky Way.

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Dark matter predictions put to test

October 6th, 2010 Updated: March 16th, 2011

Collisions in dark matter “clumps” should produce gamma rays, but a satellite looking for them has come up empty so far.

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Parsing particle experiments

October 6th, 2010 Updated: June 24th, 2014

A detector suggested dark matter collisions, but no other test has seen similar signs.

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September 2010

Winding path leads to fluid career

September 20th, 2010 Updated: September 30th, 2013

Paul Fischer can’t remember a time when he wasn’t interested in aeronautical and mechanical engineering. His passion for solving seemingly unsolvable problems came just a bit later. Fischer, now a computational scientist with the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory, connects that interest to an early fascination with the Apollo space program. […]

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This animation shows early-time pressure distribution for simulation of coolant flow in a 217-pin wire-wrapped nuclear reactor fuel subassembly, computed on 32,768 processors of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility's Blue Gene/P. The program used nearly 1 billion data points distributed through the simulated subassembly to calculate properties like pressure and temperature over time. Please click the image to run the animation in a new window.     This animation shows early-time pressure distribution for simulation of coolant flow in a 217-pin wire-wrapped nuclear reactor fuel subassembly, computed on 32,768 processors of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility's Blue Gene/P. The program used nearly 1 billion data points distributed through the simulated subassembly to calculate properties like pressure and temperature over time.

Nuclear predictive

September 20th, 2010 Updated: November 30th, 2011

Argonne National Laboratory applies mathematics and computation to engineer the next generation of nuclear reactors.

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June 2010

Alejandro Rodriguez

From Cuba to Cambridge by way of Miami

June 16th, 2010 Updated: November 30th, 2011

The former Computational Science Graduate Fellowship recipient escaped the communist regime with his family, then found a love of physics.

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Using mathematical methods he helped develop, Alejandro Rodriguez has calculated Casimir forces in these and other complex structures.

Forceful thinking

June 16th, 2010 Updated: November 30th, 2011

A quantum curiosity called the Casimir force gums up micro- and nanomachines. Work at MIT led by a newly minted alumnus of the DOE Computational Science Graduate Fellowship suggests uses for the force – and ways around it.

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This shows the Western North American power grid with the analysis results of 200 overlaid possible contingencies. Red areas indicate vulnerable portions of the power grid that network operators must address. Gray areas are causes for concern and green areas are safe. Overlaying the 200 sets of risk-level data allows operators to visualize the collective risk of contingencies on the system.

Getting a grip on the grid

June 10th, 2010 Updated: February 18th, 2013

A PNNL team enlists new algorithms and powerful computers to quickly analyze which combinations of failures most threaten the power grid.

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Grids grasp at multiple threads to block blackouts

June 10th, 2010 Updated: March 16th, 2011

A supercomputer’s unusual qualities make it a good fit with electric system problems.

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March 2010

A well-placed plug for the humble algorithm

March 16th, 2010 Updated: March 16th, 2011

The ceremony in the East Room of the White House, where President Obama bestowed the National Medal of Science on Berni Alder last October, represented the public side of the honor. But for Alder the real action occurred after the ceremony, at a White House meeting for invited guests, politicians, family and other Washington dignitaries. […]

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The master of Monte Carlo

March 16th, 2010 Updated: November 30th, 2011

Berni Alder’s Monte Carlo methods have solved problems across the scientific spectrum. Yet the Livermore-based National Medal of Science-recipient still has questions.

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Going big to study small

March 1st, 2010 Updated: March 16th, 2011

It takes a big computer to model very small things. And, like its namesake state, New York Blue is big. Made up of 36,864 processors, the massively parallel IBM Blue Gene/L is housed at DOE’s Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on New York’s Long Island, where, among other things, it’s used to model quantum dots, or […]

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Putting catalysts on track

March 1st, 2010 Updated: March 16th, 2011

Computation and experimentation combine to improve and speed design of useful compounds.

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